Observing Your Float Journey

By: | Tags: | Comments: 0 | January 29th, 2015

As you begin your own journey into floating, its valuable to regularly reflect on your experiences in the Float Pod—both individually, and as a whole, as your floats and experiences will inevitably evolve!
We always recommend floaters spend a few minutes after their session ends enjoying their relaxed state, and this is also the perfect time for observing how the float has made a difference.
Keeping track of your “progress” not only allows you to see what benefits floating has in store for you, but can also tune you into getting the most from your float in the days or weeks until your next one.
You might consider keeping a journal of your float experiences—even adding one sentence each time counts!
Do you float for pain relief? Note your pain levels after your float. Has the pain decreased since you began?
Is better sleep what you’re after? Look for any changes in the quality of your rest in the nights following your session.
Do you have less tension in your body once you leave the Float Pod? How could you begin to open these tight areas before your next float, for even more relaxation benefit?
The joy of floating doesn’t stop once you leave True REST—observe how you feel in the days after your session, too. Are you less stressed, more creative, calm? What positive impacts does floating bring into the rest of your week?
Bringing awareness to the benefits we receive from floating makes them more evident to us, and thus allows us to feel them more fully. We can only fully appreciate what we are conscious of!
In my own experience, having an awareness of what floating does for my mood, stress levels and physical tension helps prepare me to relax as I’m entering each session.
Need a starting point for your own floating observations? Here are a few leading questions that can guide you into beginning to reflect post-float…
  1. How Do You Feel in One Word?
  2. How Was This Float Different from Your Last?
  3. What Was the Best Part of the Float? How Might You Experience More of this in Future Sessions?
  4. Where in Your Body Do You Feel Less Tension?
  5. What Has Changed Since You Arrived to Float?
  6. Did you Do Anything Different to Prepare this Time?

 

Photo Credit: Phil Dolby on Flickr

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